Quadrivial Quandary:  Logophiles, Rejoice!  Each day we give you four unusual words.  Can you fit them all in one illustrative sentence?

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The Quandary for today, Saturday, July 23, 2016, consists of:
  • suffrage
  • mare's nest
  • vatic
  • connubial
Challenge: use all four words together in one illustrative sentence.

Since September 2009, word lovers have offered 6039 sentences — each one a surprise — to QQ's unique and growing library. Explore earlier Quandaries through our word list or the calendar below. View yesterday's QQ resolutions or pick a day at random.

Definitions Of Today's Words:

The right to vote; also, the exercise of such a right.
  1. A great discovery which turns out to be illusory; a hoax.
  2. A confused or complicated situation; a muddle.
    A memorial to the discovery of the Piltdown Man, later revealed as a hoax, was unveiled in Piltdown, East Sussex, UK, on this day in 1938.

Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for July 23, 2016 is:

vatic • \VAT-ik\  • adjective

: prophetic, oracular

Examples:

"Compared with [Stan] Lee’s wisecracking dialogue and narrative prose, [Jack] Kirby’s writing was stilted and often awkward, though at times it rose to a level of vatic poetic eloquence." — Jeet Heer, The New Republic, 7 Aug. 2015

"[Walt Whitman] dreamed of a new democratic civilization, which he pictured ultimately as a worldwide revolutionary democracy of labor—the vision that you can see in his vatic and ecstatic processional poem ’Song of the Broad-Axe.’" — Paul Berman, Tablet (tabletmag.com), 3 May 2016

Did you know?

Some people say only thin lines separate poetry, prophecy, and madness. We don’t know if that’s generally true, but it is in the case of vatic. The adjective derives directly from the Latin word vates, meaning "seer" or "prophet." But that Latin root is, in turn, distantly related to the Old English wōth, meaning "poetry," the Old High German wuot, meaning "madness," and the Old Irish fáith, meaning both "seer" and "poet."



connubial: of marriage or wedlock; matrimonial; conjugal.

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