Quadrivial Quandary:  Logophiles, Rejoice!  Each day we give you four unusual words.  Can you fit them all in one illustrative sentence?

Today's attempts to resolve the Quandary (login or register to compose yours):


And in Glasgow on that morning in 1948, Snooker Tam and his brother Boabie, were watching, along with Bernie Cohen and his girlfriend, Sadie Glenfinnan, the three sibling private detectives Campbeltown, Duddingston and Tangy Loch all crammed into the back of Bernie's pal Solly's taxi, with Solly and his sister Dora, the only woman cabbie in Glasgow, in the front, as the Peelers entered the Church Hall used as a base by the Uncles and Aunts of the Milngavie Cluster of the Good Shepherds Society and from which they managed and manipulated the five children's homes in Milngavie; the Polis went in mob-handed, with batons drawn and soon emerged with five hysterical women – Mrs Maybelline Rutherglen, Miss Sybill Macintosh, Miss Lynette Carruthers, Mrs Olivette Wotherspoon and Lady Utopia MacLeod – followed by Sir Cinnamon Toast, bon viveur and trencherman and CEO of The Good Shepherds Society and Chick Coocaddens, the scarred and carious serial rapist and paedophile: "whaur's the ither fower?" squeaked Tam, astonished that while the handcuffed suspects were being piled into the two Black Marias the Polis had brought with them, Sir Paladin MacFarlane, Doughty Doubleday, Martin Elginbrod and Hamish MacDonald, or AKA as he was known to the watchers, were not in custody, for of them there was no sign so, once the forces of Laura Norder had driven off, the watchers climbed out of the cab and approached the now silent and seemingly empty building: "well, we saw them aw gang in," said Boabie, "so either they's still inside or they snot!" and Bernie patted the wee laddie on his tousled head: "you've never said a truer word, Wee Man, so hoo aboot we tak a peek inside?" now, as it happens, Solly had trained as a yegg under Johnny Ramenski, the legendary peterman and safecracker and even accompanied him on missions behind enemy lines during the war, being parachuted into France, Germany, North Africa and Italy and then smuggled out again by the Resistance groups which enabled them to bring important documents back to Britain; "this'll be a doddle," he quipped as he sauntered across the street, just before an almighty explosion demolished the building and tossed him over the taxi, to land in a neighbour's garden like a discarded piece of rejectamenta!

(by MissTeriWoman)


He was a hearty trencherman
Though it had made him carious;
And also a yegg he once had been
For his pursuits were various;
Now he collects rejectamenta
And other useless impedimenta.
(by OldRawgabbit)
The Quandary for today, Tuesday, March 20, 2018, consists of:
  • trencherman
  • carious
  • yegg
  • rejectamenta, n.
Challenge: use all four words together in one illustrative sentence.

Since September 2009, word lovers have offered 6860 sentences — each one a surprise — to QQ's unique and growing library. Explore earlier Quandaries through our word list or the calendar below. View yesterday's QQ resolutions or pick a day at random.

Definitions Of Today's Words:

noun: 1. A hearty eater. 2. A hanger-on; parasite.
  1. Having caries (bone or tooth decay); decayed, rotten.
Today is World Oral Health Day, an annual event organized by the FDI World Dental Federation to raise awareness about oral health.

Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for March 20, 2018 is:

yegg • \YEG\  • noun

: one that breaks open safes to steal : safecracker; also : robber


"Last Friday night while Sonoma peacefully slept a gang of yeggs, evidently professionals for they wore gloves to conceal all fingerprints, hammered away at the big safe of the Napa Milling Company, broke it open and escaped with $153 in cash, an account book and checks totaling $215." — The Sonoma (California) Index-Tribune, 6 Sept. 1935

"The cops grabbed him and another yegg for a Philadelphia store burglary." — James Lardner and Thomas Reppetto, NYPD: A City and Its Police, 2000

Did you know?

Safecracker first appeared in print in English around 1873, but English speakers evidently felt that they needed a more colorful word for this rather colorful profession. No one is quite sure where yegg came from. Its earliest known use in print is from a 1901 New York Times article. This same article also includes the first known print use of the variant yeggmen. Yegg has always been less common than safecracker, but it still turns up once in a while.

OED Word of the Day: rejectamenta, n. Seaweed, debris, etc., washed up by the sea or by tides or floodwaters

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