Quadrivial Quandary:  Logophiles, Rejoice!  Each day we give you four unusual words.  Can you fit them all in one illustrative sentence?

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The Quandary for today, Tuesday, December 06, 2016, consists of:
  • marmorean
  • them's the facts
  • salient
  • mansuetude
Challenge: use all four words together in one illustrative sentence.

Since September 2009, word lovers have offered 6179 sentences — each one a surprise — to QQ's unique and growing library. Explore earlier Quandaries through our word list or the calendar below. View yesterday's QQ resolutions or pick a day at random.

Definitions Of Today's Words:

Resembling marble or a marble statue, for example, in smoothness, whiteness, hardness, coldness, or aloofness.
  1. (idiomatic, colloquial) Those are the facts, that’s the truth, that’s how it is; frequently used in reference to an unfortunate truth.
    The first “number”, or part, of the Encyclopædia Britannica was published in Edinburgh, Scotland, UK, on this day in 1768.

Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for December 6, 2016 is:

salient • \SAIL-yunt\  • adjective

1 : moving by leaps or springs : jumping

2 : jetting upward

3 : standing out conspicuously : prominent; especially : of notable significance

Examples:

The speech was filled with so much twisted rhetoric that it was hard to identify any salient points.

"Among the projects: … an $18 million makeover of Freedom Hall, substantial new meeting and storage space, a new ballroom and a new $70 million exhibit hall…. Those were the salient recommendations of a new master plan for the Kentucky Exposition Center…." — Sheldon Shafer, The Courier-Journal (Louisville, KY), 28 Oct. 2016

Did you know?

Salient first popped up in English in the 16th century as a term of heraldry meaning "rampant but leaning forward as if leaping." By the mid-17th century, it had leaped into more general use in the senses of "moving by leaps or springs" or "spouting forth." Those senses aren’t too much of a jump from the word’s parent, the Latin verb salire, which means "to leap." Salire also occurs in the etymologies of some other English words, including somersault and sally, as well as Salientia, the name for an order of amphibians that includes frogs, toads, and other notable jumpers. Today, salient is usually used to describe things that are physically prominent (such as a salient nose) or that stand out figuratively (such as the salient features of a painting or the salient points in an argument).



mansuetude: mildness; gentleness.

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