Quadrivial Quandary:  Logophiles, Rejoice!  Each day we give you four unusual words.  Can you fit them all in one illustrative sentence?

Today's attempts to resolve the Quandary (login or register to compose yours):

1

Dr. Zweig claimed to love all the picayune details of man-made things throughout history, but that was a bit of sly herpestery* to cover up the fact that he was a timon at heart; in his utopia he would have many ideological followers or heir apparents, but no one wanted to agree with him and, more importantly, if he did have followers he would have to hate them, and then how could one say they were his followers?

*Herpestery - mongoose-like quality (or meerkat-like - pun on Timon)

(by Elijah Shiffer)
The Quandary for today, Wednesday, April 16, 2014, consists of:
  • timon
  • heir apparent
  • utopia
  • picayune
Challenge: use all four words together in one illustrative sentence.

Since September 2009, word lovers have offered 5325 sentences — each one a surprise — to QQ's unique and growing library. Explore earlier Quandaries through our word list or the calendar below. View yesterday's QQ resolutions or pick a day at random.

Definitions Of Today's Words:

One who hates or distrusts humankind.
  1. (usually monarchy) Someone who will definitely inherit, assuming he survives the one from whom he is inheriting.

Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for April 16, 2014 is:

utopia • \yoo-TOH-pee-uh\  • noun
: an impractical scheme for social improvement

Examples:
To some people, gated communities are visions of Utopia—safe, quiet, and out of the way.

"Peninsula Players has entertained generations of audiences since it was founded in 1935 by a brother-and-sister team, Caroline and Richard Fisher, who dreamed of an artistic utopia where actors, designers and technicians could focus on their craft while being surrounded by nature in a contemplative setting." — From an article in the Green Bay Press-Gazette, March 12, 2014

Did you know?
In 1516, English humanist Sir Thomas More published a book titled Utopia. It compared social and economic conditions in Europe with those of an ideal society on an imaginary island located off the coast of the Americas. More wanted to imply that the perfect conditions on his fictional island could never really exist, so he called it "Utopia," a name he created by combining the Greek words "ou" (meaning "no, not") and "topos" (meaning "place," a root used in our word "topography"). The earliest generic use of "utopia" was for an imaginary and indefinitely remote place. The current use of "utopia," referring to an ideal place or society, was inspired by More’s description of Utopia’s perfection.

picayune: of little value or account; small; trifling.

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