Quadrivial Quandary:  Logophiles, Rejoice!  Each day we give you four unusual words.  Can you fit them all in one illustrative sentence?

Today's attempts to resolve the Quandary (login or register to compose yours):

1

Mr Smithers soon shed his youthful pedagogic idealism once plunged into the desperate dog-eat-dog sprattle of the inner-city classroom, a rude awakening that required all his resources of disciplinary realpolitik: how, for example, was one to deal with the insolent and unrurly young Sproat in Form Three, a veritable Cacus redux, who, rather than breathing fire like his mythical prototype, was in the vile habit of continuously gleeking?

(by a_i_blyth)
The Quandary for today, Tuesday, October 21, 2014, consists of:
  • sprattle
  • gleek
  • redux
  • realpolitik
Challenge: use all four words together in one illustrative sentence.

Since September 2009, word lovers have offered 5390 sentences — each one a surprise — to QQ's unique and growing library. Explore earlier Quandaries through our word list or the calendar below. View yesterday's QQ resolutions or pick a day at random.

Definitions Of Today's Words:

noun: A scramble or struggle. verb intr.: To scramble or struggle.
  1. (archaic) To jest, ridicule, or mock; to make sport of.
  2. (informal) To discharge a thin stream of liquid through the teeth or from under the tongue.

Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for October 21, 2014 is:

redux • \ree-DUKS\  • adjective
: brought back

Examples:
Now running in his own campaign, the son of the former mayor was advised to develop his own identity and not simply portray himself as his father redux.

"Think of it as ’Combat Evolved’ redux. ’Destiny’ wants to meld the multiplayer and single-player experience into a coherent whole." — Gieson Cacho, San Jose Mercury News, September 16, 2014

Did you know?
In Latin, redux (from the verb reducere, meaning "to lead back") can mean "brought back" or "bringing back." The Romans used redux as an epithet for the Goddess Fortuna with its "bringing back" meaning; Fortuna Redux was "one who brings another safely home." But it was the "brought back" meaning that made its way into English. Redux belongs to a small class of English adjectives that are always used postpositively—that is, they always follow the words they modify. Redux has a history of showing up in titles of English works, such as John Dryden’s Astraea Redux (a poem "on the happy restoration and return of his sacred majesty, Charles the Second"), Anthony Trollope’s Phineas Redux, and John Updike’s Rabbit Redux.

realpolitik: political realism or practical politics.

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