Quadrivial Quandary:  Logophiles, Rejoice!  Each day we give you four unusual words.  Can you fit them all in one illustrative sentence?

Attempts to resolve the Quandary:

1

Sarah Siddons and Gracie Long strolled in the warm evening which almost synoptically, they imagined, spread right around the world, but their steps took them only as far as the Argyll Subscription Rooms, on Great Windmill Street, arriving just as the patrons, lively and high-spirited, were emerging onto the pavement, like passengers disembarking after a long journey in a steamer; arm-in-arm and dressed after the fashion, in satins and silks, each with a tiny parasol and over-large hat, they looked every bit the high-class street-walkers they enjoyed being; here were many of Sarah's old friends, some with a gentleman, others still on the look-out, all enjoying the balmy night with it's hint of promise, of activities to be enjoyed later; gentlemen, young and old, sauntered among the crowd, like the agents of Fruit and Veg retailers surveying the produce in Covent Garden, or burglars 'casing' a potential 'joint' to 'break and enter', occasionally stopping to engage in barter with women they fancied, or felt they might be able to afford – and young Gracie drew them like moths to a flame; which was when Sarah nudged Gracie and pointed to a couple of young swells, dressed immaculately, but with that just-off-kilter look which indicated their provincial origins: "them's a likely pair, Gracie, which one does you fancy?" and Gracie ran her eye over them: not brothers, possibly cousins, certainly close friends, with their arms linked also, and pretending to converse, as they slowly meandered through the throng, their eyes everywhere but on each other: "let's put em out o their misery, dearie, they'll be up for a quickie or my names Jack Sprat!" and she lead young Gracie on a direction which put them face-to-face within twenty steps, and it was one of those seemingly inadvertent confrontations in which neither side seems able to pass the other, as a step to the right by the mashers was countered by a step to the left by the white doves; then the other way, then back again, until they were all laughing at the foolishness of it: "if you will permit me, Ladies, to introduce myself – Ernest Boulton and my friend Frederick Park, spending an evening enjoying the summer spectacle" and the two gents doffed their bowlers to the girls, who curtsied and Sarah replied: "Sarah Siddons of Drury Lane, and my young cousin Gracie Long, who's Scotch and down for a spell to learn the manners of Society!" and Ernest blushed to his roots: "would you like a drink with us, if you can recommend a decent House, we do not know London as well as, I dare say, you Ladies, that is, I assume . . . . ." and he broke off, not really knowing the destination of his words and deciding to jump off the ship before it ran aground on the rocks, Sarah and Gracie laughed naturally and spontaneously, seeming quite the opposite of what they were and, to these provincials who laughed freely with them, appeared to be Ladies of the Land, rather than the Ladies of the Night they had been well warned about before their evening excursion; but Gracie took command and, taking a hold of Ernest and allowing Gracie and Frederick to pair up behind them, said that she knew a clean and honest place just along the way and lead them to a tavern which was not so full that they couldn't find a nice table for four in s little booth, which allowed Gracie and Frederick to slide in and face Sarah and Ernest across the table; Ernest hailed a passing waiter who, taking their orders, was quickly back with their drinks; Ernest paid him with an appropriate tip and then proposed a toast to their "good health and happiness," which gave Sarah the entrance to enquire about his own happiness – what, where, how, when and with whom did he find happiness? which was so direct and comprehensive that Ernest seemed at a loss to answer it, but Frederick blurted out: "with me, of course," and then looked a little abashed; "why," said Sadie, "but you are a boy!" and then paused and looked again at him, "although, I can see that you are very pretty and I don’t suppose it would take much to turn you into a girl," she laughed, to lighten the effect of what she had said; which was when Ernest asked, in such a soft voice that Gracie had to lean forward to catch his words: "and do you thin the same of me?" at which Sadie threw up her hands: "oh Lordy, Lord! you are a pair of funsters!" and after their laughter had died down, she became very direct and asked them what employment they had: "well, call me Ernie, I'm a Bank Clerk and Fred is a Law Student, we don't earn a lot, well I don't, but Fred has an allowance, which helps out; we've got rooms in Tottenham, but would love to live closer to Town, we've been looking for a handy place which would mean less travelling and give us a bit more freedom to . . . . ." at which pause, Sadie asked: "do what?" and Fred answered for Ernie, "be ourselves!" and this time it was Gracie who asked: "what, or who, are yourselves?" and Ernie said: "I'm Stella, and Fred is Fanny!"

(by MissTeriWoman)
The Quandary for Saturday, August 26, 2017 consisted of: Challenge: use all four words together in one illustrative sentence.

Since September 2009, word lovers have offered 7145 sentences — each one a surprise — to QQ's unique and growing library. Explore other Quandaries through our word list or the calendar below. View yesterday's QQ resolutions or pick a day at random.

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